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The Brookdale Foundation Group

300

Frank W. Burr Blvd

Suite 13

Teaneck, NJ

07666

 

Phone:

201-836-4602

 

Fax:

201-836-4342

 

Patrick R. Hof, MD

Patrick R. Hof

Dr. Hof earned his MD from the University of Geneva School of Medicine, Switzerland in 1985. He came to the USA as a postgraduate fellow at the Research Institute of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA. In 1989 he joined Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York where he is now Professor of Neuroscience, Geriatrics, and Ophthalmology, the Regenstreif Professor of Neuroscience, the Vice-Chair of the Department of Neuroscience, and the Director of the Kastor Neurobiology of Aging Laboratories.

Dr. Hof's research is directed towards the study of selective neuronal vulnerability in dementing illnesses and aging using classical neuropathologic as well as modern quantitative morphologic methods to determine the cellular features that render the human brain uniquely vulnerable to degenerative disorders. Dr. Hof also conducts analyses of the distribution and connectivity patterns of pyramidal neuron subpopulations in the macaque monkey cerebral cortex in young and very old animals to study possible age-related changes in the neurochemical characteristics of the neurons of origin of corticocortical projections.

He also develops morphometric, magnetic resonance microscopy, and stereologic tools for the study of neuroanatomical specimens and brain atlas development. Among his major contributions, Dr. Hof demonstrated that specific neurons are selectively vulnerable in dementing disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. He has made contributions to quantifying the differences between normal aging brains and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as other mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and autism. Dr Hof is also the curator of a mammalian brain collection that includes a large series of great ape specimens, as well as and extensive sample of marine mammals. He has contributed considerably to our understanding of the structure of the cetacean brain and has discovered neuronal types unique to whales and hominids.

Brookdale Fellow Class of 1991

8/09